click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 3
LINKTV 3
CNN 2
MSNBCW 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
CSPAN 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
on the notion he was going to transform the way the u.s. conducted its foreign policy around the world. he then proceeded to double down on some of the greatest successes of the bush administration. if you look at the use of the state secrets privilege or the with the obama administration expanded the drone wars, powered special operations forces from jsoc to join special operations command to operate in countries where the united states is not at war, if you look at the way the obama administration essentially boxed congress out of any effective oversight role of the covert aspect of u.s. foreign policy, what we really have is a president who has normalized for many, net -- many liberals, the policies they once opposed under the bush and ministration. this has been a war presidency. yesterday as president obama talked about how we don't need a state of perpetual war, multiple u.s. drone strikes in yemen, a country we are not at war with, where the u.s. has killed a tremendous number of civilians. to make, most disturbing about this is john brennan, who really was the architect of this dro
. >> reporter: a number of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >>> well, most people who come to washington for president obama's second inauguration are happy just to be able to witness history. >>> but some visitors want a little bit more, like monogrammed pillow cases and a 24-hour butler. who wouldn't want that? you can get it all for a price. we'll tell you about it when we come back. d. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
woods, a co-director of foreign policy in focus at the institute for policy studies. welcome to "democracy now!" let's start off with the hostage situation in algeria. what do you understand at this point? >> first, i think we have to extend condolences to those families of those to a lost life. situation is fluid. hostages reportedly have been taken coming from at least eight different countries, including britain, japan, ireland. there are still reports that not only those that have been killed coming potentially from britain, france, japan and other countries, but also this is a crisis that is still under way. the algerian military is still seeing this as an ongoing incident. the information is scant t and fluid, changing very rapidly. it is coming out very slowly because of -- remember, algeria is essentially a military state. information is not flowing freely. there is a reluctance to share information with international actors, particularly former colonial powers, given the history of what has happened in algeria. >> the reports are coming out initially saying many of t
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
far. >> i have a foreign policy question but first i wanted to ask, for the administration's response, the house has now passed the three-month suspension of the u.s. debt ceiling. what's your comments? >> it's the same as it was yesterday. the president believes that we need to, as a country, do the responsible thing and without drama or delay pay our bills. meet our commitments. ideally we would extend a raise -- or raise the debt ceiling for a long period of time so that this is not a question, so that the uncertainty that has surrounded this issue of late because of the political strategy that house republicans have taken will be removed or would be removed. it is certainly important to recognize that the bill that passed the house today, the position that the house republicans took beginning late last week represents a fundamental change from a strategy that they pursued up until this point which is to try to link the debt ceiling to an ideological agenda of spending cuts in which the choice presented to the american people was, either face dramatic cuts in social security or med
of collective action on issues like foreign policy and trade, and when we leave the door from the open to new members. a new settlement subject to the democratic legitimacy and accountability of national parliaments where member states combined in flexible cooperation, respecting national differences and not always trying to eliminate them, and in which we have proved that some powers can, in fact, be returned to member states. in other words, a settlement which would be entirely in keeping with the mission for an updated european union i have described today. more flexible, more adaptable, more open, fit for the challenges of the modern age. now, to those who say, and there are those who say it, that a new settlement can't be negotiated, i would say listen to the views of other parties in other european countries arguing for powers to flow back to european states. and also look to at what we've achieved already. we have ended the obligation for britain to bail out the eurozone members. we have kept britain out of the fiscal compact. we have launched a process which turns an existing justice
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
, congress and the administration should be implementing policies that encourage job creation, rein in government regulations, replace our convoluted tax code with one that is fair, simple and certain, open foreign markets to american manufactured goods and agricultural products and develop a comprehensive energy policy. we are not immune from the laws of economics that face every nation. the congressional budget office estimates that government spending on health care entitlements, soegts security and -- social security and interest on the national debt will consume 100% of the total revenues generated by the federal government by the year 2025. that means the money that the government spends on national defense, transportation, veterans health care and other government programs will have to be borrowed, driving us even further into debt. c.b.o. issued a report last june which warned that unless we work to reduce our debt, we face the increased probability of a sudden fiscal crisis that would cause investors to lose confidence in the government's ability to manage its budget and th
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)